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Alternative Currencies and Sustainable Economies – TEDxBerlin – Bernard Lietaer – 11/30/09

22 Dec

D17: Take Back the Commons | Occupy Wall Street Video

21 Dec

Children of OWS post paper hearts, cops rip them down

12 Dec

By Muriel Kane
Sunday, December 11, 2011

cops-rip-down-paper-hearts-screencap

An anti-bullying march by parents and children directed against the New York Police Department’s arrests of peaceful protesters encountered a first-hand taste of what they were protesting against when police ripped down the paper hearts the children were attempting to post at City Hall.

As described by Margaret Flowers at October2011.org, “Parents for Occupy Wall Street, a collective community of parents & organizations in support of Occupy Wall Street met in Union Square Park on Saturday, December 10th (The International Day of Human Rights) to create 5,000 paper hearts to be delivered to Mayor Bloomberg. Each paper heart represented a peaceful protester that has been wrongfully arrested since the emergence of Occupy Wall Street movement.”

“We marched down to City Hall with our children eager to deliver our hearts and our message,” the account continues. “As we were not allowed onto the steps of City Hall due to renovations underway, we decided to tape the hearts onto the gates in front. We as parents watched in disbelief and disgust as the NYPD tore down the children’s artwork, ripped their hearts, and broke the children’s signs over their knees.”

This video was posted by Parents for OWS at YouTube, December 11, 2011.

Muriel Kane
Muriel Kane
Muriel Kane is an associate editor at Raw Story. She joined Raw Story as a researcher in 2005, with a particular focus on the Jack Abramoff affair and other Bush administration scandals. She worked extensively with former investigative news managing editor Larisa Alexandrovna, with whom she has co-written numerous articles in addition to her own work. Prior to her association with Raw Story, she spent many years as an independent researcher and writer with a particular focus on history, literature, and contemporary social and political attitudes. Follow her on Twitter at @Muriel_Kane

Occupiers Crash Chamber Of Commerce Holiday Party With Human Red Carpet

9 Dec

http://thinkprogress.org/special/2011/12/08/385779/occupiers-crashes-chamber-of-commerce-party-with-human-red-carpet/

By Alex Seitz-Wald on Dec 8, 2011 at 7:29 pm

Several dozen Occupy DC protesters rolled out the human red carpet for the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s holiday party at their Washington, DC headquarters this evening. The Chamber is the nation’s largest corporate lobby group. As guests entered, protesters shouted, “You walk on our rights, now walk on us!” encouraging attendees to trample on the activists laying underneath the red carpet painted with “99%.” No one did, sadly, at least while ThinkProgress was in attendance.

Chamber Executive Vice President Bruce Josten stood at the foot of the carpet most of the time, welcoming his frightened, amused, and befuddled guests, easily distinguishable from the activists by their business attire. Photos and video below:

 

 

 

A Message To The Oakland Police: “You Have No Power!” (David Icke)

23 Nov

http://breakthematrix.com/activism/message-oakland-police-power/
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4407627029 038bdd1118 A Message To The Oakland Police: You Have No Power!

 

Occupy protester hands President Obama a note

23 Nov
(Charles Dharapak/AP)

The Occupy movement trailed President Obama to New Hampshire today, where protestors briefly interrupted his jobs speech at a Manchester high school.

Using the so-called “human microphone” method, protestors shouted Obama down just minutes into his speech, calling attention to the arrest of peaceful protestors at Occupy movements around the country.

They were quickly countered by students, who began chanting, “Obama! Obama!”

But after the speech, a member of the movement got close enough to Obama as the president was shaking hands with members of the audience pass him a note, which was photographed by the Associated Press’ Charles Dharapak:

(Charles Dharapak/AP)

Mr. President: Over 4000 peaceful protesters have been arrested. While bankers continue to destroy the American economy. You must stop the assault on our 1st amendment rights.  Your silence sends a message that police brutality is acceptable. Banks got bailed out. We got sold out.

President Obama isn’t the first politician to be targeted by the Occupy movement. Two weeks ago, Michele Bachmann was briefly interrupted by Occupy Charleston protesters at speech in South Carolina.

http://d.yimg.com/nl/ynews/blog/player.html#vid=27367297&browseCarouselUI=hide

Ten Ways the Occupy Movement Changes Everything

20 Nov

http://www.yesmagazine.org/people-power/ten-ways-the-occupy-movement-changes-everything?fb_ref=likebutton

Many question whether this movement can really make a difference. The truth is that it is already changing everything. Here’s how.
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posted Nov 10, 2011

This Changes Everything Book Cover with Publishing Information

Edited by Sarah van Gelder and the staff of YES! Magazine.
Berrett-Koehler Publishers, 2011, 96 pages.
$6.95 (30% off the cover price when you buy from YES!. All royalties from this book are donated to the Occupy Wall Street movement)

Before the Occupy Wall Street movement, there was little discussion of the outsized power of Wall Street and the diminishing fortunes of the middle class.

The media blackout was especially remarkable given that issues like jobs and corporate influence on elections topped the list of concerns for most Americans.

Occupy Wall Street changed that. In fact, it may represent the best hope in years that “we the people” will step up to take on the critical challenges of our time. Here’s how the Occupy movement is already changing everything:

1. It names the source of the crisis.
Political insiders have avoided this simple reality: The problems of the 99% are caused in large part by Wall Street greed, perverse financial incentives, and a corporate takeover of the political system. Now that this is understood, the genie is out of the bottle and it can’t be put back in.

2. It provides a clear vision of the world we want.
We can create a world that works for everyone, not just the wealthiest 1%. And we, the 99%, are using the spaces opened up by the Occupy movement to conduct a dialogue about the world we want.

3. It sets a new standard for public debate.
Those advocating policies and proposals must now demonstrate that their ideas will benefit the 99%. Serving only the 1% will not suffice, nor will claims that the subsidies and policies that benefit the 1% will eventually “trickle down.”

4. It presents a new narrative.
The solution is not to starve government or impose harsh austerity measures that further harm middle-class and poor people already reeling from a bad economy. Instead, the solution is to free society and government from corporate dominance. A functioning democracy is our best shot at addressing critical social, environmental, and economic crises.

5. It creates a big tent.
We, the 99%, are people of all ages, races, occupations, and political beliefs. We will resist being divided or marginalized. We are learning to work together with respect.

6. It offers everyone a chance to create change.
No one is in charge; no organization or political party calls the shots. Anyone can get involved, offer proposals, support the occupations, and build the movement. Because leadership is everywhere and new supporters keep turning up, there is a flowering of creativity and a resilience that makes the movement nearly impossible to shut down.

7. It is a movement, not a list of demands.
The call for deep change—not temporary fixes and single-issue reforms—is the movement’s sustaining power. The movement is sometimes criticized for failing to issue a list of demands, but doing so could keep it tied to status quo power relationships and policy options. The occupiers and their supporters will not be boxed in.

8. It combines the local and the global.
People in cities and towns around the world are setting their own local agendas, tactics, and aims. What they share in common is a critique of corporate power and an identification with the 99%, creating an extraordinary wave of global solidarity.

9. It offers an ethic and practice of deep democracy and community.
Slow, patient decision-making in which every voice is heard translates into wisdom, common commitment, and power. Occupy sites are set up as communities in which anyone can discuss grievances, hopes, and dreams, and where all can experiment with living in a space built around mutual support.

10. We have reclaimed our power.
Instead of looking to politicians and leaders to bring about change, we can see now that the power rests with us. Instead of being victims to the forces upending our lives, we are claiming our sovereign right to remake the world.

Like all human endeavors, Occupy Wall Street and its thousands of variations and spin-offs will be imperfect. There have already been setbacks and divisions, hardships and injury. But as our world faces extraordinary challenges—from climate change to soaring inequality—our best hope is the ordinary people, gathered in imperfect democracies, who are finding ways to fix a broken world.

Tents at Occupy Oakland photo by Seth Schneider

Occupy Oakland.

Photo by Seth Schneider.


This article is adapted from the book, This Changes Everything: Occupy Wall Street and the 99% Movement edited by Sarah van Gelder and the staff of YES! Magazine and published November 2011 byBerrett-Koehler Publishers.

Sarah van Gelder and David Korten are co-founders of YES! Magazine; Steve Piersanti is publisher ofBerrett-Koehler Publishers. This article is available under a Creative Commons Attribution NoDerivs (CC BY-ND) license, which allows for redistribution, commercial and non-commercial, as long as it is passed along unchanged and in whole, with credit to the original publication of this book (photos not included). More on the book and other resources can be found at www.yesmagazine.org/owsbook.

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